Category Archives: Columns

Gavels ‘n’ Paddles: Mackintosh bedside cabinet, $328,000, Lyon & Turnbull

Mackintosh bedside cabinet, $328,000, Lyon & Turnbull

Recent Auction Results from Near & Far By Ken Hall   A bedside cabinet by Charles Rennie Mackintosh (Scottish, 1868-1928) sold for $328,000 in an online Decorative Arts: Design Since 1860 auction held Nov. 2-3 by Lyon & Turnbull in Edinburgh, Scotland. Also, an extra-size “Tudric” pewter and abalone clock design, circa 1900, by Archibald […]

Exploring Antique Technologies: Science and Sparkles – Demystifying your Jewelry Collection

Archeologists have discovered what they claim is the world’s oldest natural pearl on Marawah Island, off the coast of Abu Dhabi. The pearl dates back 8,000 years to the Neolithic period – the last stage of the Stone Age. It was found in a layer at a Neolithic site that dates to 5800 B.C. to 5600 B.C. “The presence of pearls at archeological sites is evidence that the pearl trade existed from at least as far back as the Neolithic period,” said Abdulla Khalfan Al-Kaabi, the director of the archeological survey.

by Kary Pardy   How many times have you looked through a jewelry display at your favorite antique shop and was just a bit unsure about the quality or elements of a piece you wanted to get as a gift? When you’re considering buying antique jewelry or are curious about something you already own, it […]

Antiques Peek: Birthday Bling

Early promotional card for birthstones featured at the local jeweler

by Jessica Kosinski Have you ever received or purchased jewelry that featured your birthstone? The tradition of birthstones incorporated in rings, necklaces, and other jewelry seems like one that has been around forever. That’s why most of us don’t even question it. However, like everything else, there is an origin story associated with birthstones. Let’s […]

Gavels ‘n’ Paddles: Russian triptych icon, $25,000, Doyle

Russian triptych icon, $25,000, Doyle

Recent Auction Results from Near & Far By Ken Hall   A patinated metal and cloisonné enamel triptych icon, featuring a depiction of the Resurrection in the central panel flanked by images of St. Alexander Nevsky and St. Nicholas the Wonderworker, sold for $25,000 at an auction of Russian Works of Art held October 28th […]

The 100 Year Perspective

On January 1, 1921, California beat Ohio State 28-0 in the Rose Bowl. In that same week, the country’s first religious service radio broadcast aired on KDKA-Pittsburgh, Turkey made peace with Armenia, and Eugene O’Neill’s “Diff’rent” premiered in New York City. The second year in what would turn out to be an explosive decade of […]

Gavels ‘n’ Paddles: Alfa Romeo concept cars, $14.8 million, Sotheby’s

Three Alfa Romeo B.A.T. concept cars together brought $14.8 million in sales of Contemporary and Impressionist & Modern Art held October 28th by Sotheby’s

Recent Auction Results from Near & Far By Ken Hall Three Alfa Romeo B.A.T. concept cars together brought $14.8 million in sales of Contemporary and Impressionist & Modern Art held October 28th by Sotheby’s in New York City. Also, Alberto Giacometti’s towering female sculpture from 1947 titled Femme Leoni sold for $25.9 million; two works […]

Exploring Antique Technologies: Shaped in Steel – Dissecting the Technology Behind your Edged Weapons

The Roman gladius was a short (two feet), sharply-pointed, double-edged sword and its design had evolved over the centuries to be the ideal weapon for the legions of the Roman Empire. It was forged from high-grade steel and was primarily suited for the Roman fighting style, where shield usage was heavy and swords were called upon to thrust and stab through the shield wall. In their book From Sumer to Rome: the Military Capabilities of Ancient Armies, historians Richard Gabriel and Karen Metz wrote that in the hands of a highly trained legionnaire, the gladius “was the most deadly of all weapons produced by ancient armies, and it killed more soldiers than any other weapon in history until the invention of the gun.” photo: Wikipedia

by Kary Pardy There are lots of reasons to be drawn to edged weapons, and their beauty and history are chief amongst them. Each piece carries with it a complicated past that is directly connected to our most violent and sometimes, most noble, heroic stories. Whether you’ve got a parade sword or your ancestor’s Bowie […]

Antiques Peek: Military Badges

Army of the Potomic Calvalry Corps

by Jessica Kosinski As modern humans, we are used to conflict; whether in the form of a small disagreement with a neighbor or a full-scale war. There is evidence that such conflicts existed well before well-documented eras. Archaeologists indicate that, in the earliest days of humanity, the population was too low for large battles to […]

Gavels ‘n’ Paddles: Friedeberg chair, $10,000, Doyle

A ‘Hand Chair’ by the Mexican Surrealist artist Pedro Friedeberg, introduced in 1962, sold for $10,000 at Doyle Auction

Recent Auction Results from Near & Far By Ken Hall A ‘Hand Chair’ by the Mexican Surrealist artist Pedro Friedeberg, introduced in 1962, sold for $10,000 at an auction of items from the Maison Jansen-designed home of film producer and distributor Walter Manley and his wife Janice held October 7th by Doyle in New York. […]

Gavels ‘n’ Paddles: American Life Bitters bottle, $42,000, Glass Works Auctions

An American Life Bitters bottle made in Ohio circa 1865-1875 sold for $42,000 in an online-only auction held Sept. 21-28 by Glass Works Auction

Recent Auction Results from Near & Far By Ken Hall An American Life Bitters bottle made in Ohio circa 1865-1875 sold for $42,000 in an online-only auction held Sept. 21-28 by Glass Works Auctions, based in East Greenville, Pa. Also, a Constitution Bitters bottle made in New York circa 1865-1875 brought $23,000; a St. Drake’s […]